US Violates Afghan Prison Agreement, Karzai Orders Troops to Re-Take Prison

By on November 20, 2012
An Afghanistan National Army soldier, Na

by Ezra Van Auken

The United States’ and Afghanistan’s relatively new leader or US installment, President Hamid Karzai, very rarely butts heads when it comes to Western military occupation in Afghanistan. However, just recently President Karzai has thrown accusations at the US for disobeying an agreement the two made in March.

Karzai says that US officials are not only violating an agreement between the two countries but are also illegally continuing to hold prisoners captive. The reason Karzai believes the move to hold prisoners is illegal is because the Afghan courts and government ordered the inmates to be allowed out of confinement.

Negotiation and agreements in March came under the notion that six months from then, the Afghan prison would be given back to the Afghan government.

A spokesperson for the Afghan President, Aimal Faizi, noted to reporters that US soldiers are detaining over 70 individuals, all of who have been ordered by the Afghan courts to be released. The Afghanis have dropped charges for 57 of the prisoners. US officials have said that the reason for not allowing the inmates freedom is because they remain a US national security threat.

Yesterday, President Karzai explained that the lack of ownership by the US is “a serious breach of the Memorandum of Understanding.” Besides calling out the US for failure to abide by an agreement, the President also ordered Afghan troops to regain control of the prison complex, Parwan detention facility. The US forces are still holding a closed section of the prison off, which is where detainees are being kept.

“These acts are completely against the agreement that has been signed between Afghanistan and the US president,” Karzai explained. Since September, when the Afghan government was supposed to receive prisoners, according to the agreement, US officials have slowly backed away from that idea, citing that it would be too problematic to do so.

Afghan officials also report that US forces are making an increasing amount of raids that only result in more and more prisoners, bringing in about 100 detainees a month.

In the debacle over prisons and prisoners, the US wanted to make sure that some prisoners were not allowed to have a right to free trial due to the fact that the individuals were too dangerous in the first place. Unfortunately for the US, spokesman Faizi commented that by not giving those members a right to fair trial would be violating Afghan law.

“There is nothing by the name of ‘administrative detention’ in our laws, yet the US is insisting that there are a number of people who, while there is not enough evidence against them, are a threat to US national security,” Faizi said.

United States officials have not responded to the claims by the Afghan government or President Karzai.

Clearly the US has failed at stabilizing Afghanistan after a decade long occupation. The Western nation isn’t even capable of giving up sovereignty to the Afghan government because of fears that it would turn for the worst. Instead of realizing the reality of what the US has gotten itself into, Obama’s newly endorsed General for Afghanistan, Joe Dunford, hopes to stay in Afghanistan past the 2014 “so called deadline”, which many other officials favor as well.

Joe Dunford went before lawmakers in DC this past week to testify in hopes of being the next commander for Afghanistan, although nothing official has been made.

Image Reference

Afghan National Army Soldiers Getting Ready to Rock ~ Global Military Review. (n.d.).Global Military Review. Retrieved from http://globalmilitaryreview.blogspot.com/2011/06/afghan-national-army-soldiers-getting.html

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