Tennessee Second Amendment Victory: Dyer County Passes Resolution

By on July 29, 2013
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by Ali Papademetriou

When it comes to defending citizens’ natural right to self-defense, state and local lawmakers have continuously been taking a stand in recent months. Some of the most recent were in Michigan, Alaska and Pennsylvania.

Three townships in Oscoda County, Michigan – Comins, Greenwood and Big Creek – approved resolutions late last month to protect county residents’ right to keep and bear arms. Just days following, Alaska’s Governor Sean Parnell signed a bill, HB 69, prohibiting government officials from enforcing indefinite detention or federal gun regulations – a doubly whammy in the name of liberty for Alaskans. On July 1, TSW reported on the Constable of the 3rd Ward of the Borough of Perkasie, Bucks County, Pennsylvania passing a resolution to completely protect the Second Amendment.

Now a Tennessee County has joined in on the fight by also passing a measure, and based on the vote, it looks like officials’ viewpoints toward preserving liberty are promising. According to the State Gazette, on June 13, the Dyer County Local Government Committee held a meeting, the first in more than a year, to support the Second Amendment.

At that meeting, Commissioner Dr. Brandon Dodds presented to the committee a resolution to uphold Dyer County, Tennessee residents’ natural and constitutional right to self-defense and specifically their rights to bear arms. “I believe it is one of the most important amendments. I believe it is not only illegal but unenforceable whenever the federal government passes a law limiting the Second Amendment,” Dodds told the State Gazette.

After weeks of review, the Committee passed the resolution unanimously this past Monday night during another meeting. The resolution is now in effect, as it states that it shall become effective upon its passage and approval.

The Dyer County Legislative Body hereby requests that the legislative, judicial, and executive branches of the government of the great and sovereign state of Tennessee adopt and enact any and all measures necessary to reject and nullify the enforcement of any federal laws, acts, orders, rules or regulations in violation of the Constitution of the United States,” reads the resolution.

Interestingly, this is not Tennessee’s first go-round with pro-Second Amendment legislation. In February, TSW reported on Senator Mae Beavers introducing the 2nd Amendment Preservation Act or Senate Bill 250, which would stop the federal government from attempting to “Ban, regulate, or restrict… ownership, transfer, possession, or manufacture of a firearm, a firearm accessory, or ammunition,” in the state.

Also in February, Tennessee’s Madison County Commission approved its 2nd Amendment Preservation resolution with an 18 to 6 vote after Commissioner Adrian Eddleman introduced it.

A month later, Carter County voted 16 to 2 on a resolution that requested that the governor and state legislature “immediately pass acts to protect, preserve and defend the citizens of Carter County and the state of Tennessee guaranteed by the Second Amendment… and specifically to immediately pass any acts as may be appropriate to nullify the implementation within the state of Tennessee of any federal law, regulation or executive order enacted to restrict the rights of citizens of Tennessee to keep and bear arms.”

Clearly, Tennessee doesn’t mess around when it comes to preserving an essential right that is not only natural but is also granted by the Constitution. Tennessee is also setting an excellent example of how powerful local governments really are.

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One Comment

  1. Lin

    July 29, 2013 at 11:04 pm

    North Carolina take a lesson from Tennessee and don’t let anyone in any government take away our rights. Protect the CONSTITUTION at any and all costs.
    Thank you Tennessee, Alaska and other states who have done this same thing

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