Missouri House Committee votes to Nullify All Federal Gun Control Efforts

By on April 12, 2013
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by TAC Update

In Missouri yesterday, the State House General Laws committee voted 9-3 in favor of HB436, the 2nd Amendment Preservation Act.   If passed into law, the bill would nullify virtually every federal gun control measure on the books.  It reads, in part:

All federal acts, laws, orders, rules, and regulations, whether past, present, or future, which infringe on the people’s right to keep and bear arms as guaranteed by the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution and Article I, Section 23 of the Missouri Constitution shall be invalid in this state, shall not be recognized by this state, shall be specifically rejected by this state, and shall be considered null and void and of no effect in this state.

(2) Such federal acts, laws, orders, rules, and regulations include, but are not limited to:
(a) The provisions of the federal Gun Control Act of 1934;
(b) The provisions of the federal Gun Control Act of 1968;
(c) Any tax, levy, fee, or stamp imposed on firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition not common to all other goods and services which could have a chilling effect on the purchase or ownership of those items by law-abiding citizens;
(d) Any registering or tracking of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition which could have a chilling effect on the purchase or ownership of those items by law-abiding citizens;
(e) Any registering or tracking of the owners of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition which could have a chilling effect on the purchase or ownership of those items by law-abiding citizens;
(f) Any act forbidding the possession, ownership, or use or transfer of any type of firearm, firearm accessory, or ammunition by law-abiding citizens; and
(g) Any act ordering the confiscation of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition from law-abiding citizens.

There is no stronger protection for the right to keep and bear arms anywhere in the country – if passed into law. Currently that title goes to Kansas, where an almost-as-strong bill is sitting on Governor Brownback’s desk awaiting signature or veto.

According to Ron Calzone of Missouri First – the leading state-level organization supporting this bill, HB436 will now go to the Rules committee, then to the full House.

A companion bill, SB325 introduced by State Senator Brian Nieves, has already passed the General laws committee in the Senate and will go through a similar process there.  Moving both bills simultaneously is an excellent strategy towards passage into law as it will help fast track the measures to the Governor’s desk with enough time on the calendar to override his veto. Inside sources say if the committees move the bills forward, a veto-proof majority is attainable with strong grassroots support.

Image Reference

Flickr/Makatsuta

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One Comment

  1. Yolande Camak

    May 13, 2013 at 12:59 pm

    The second amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees every American the right to bear arms. Has any law ever been so ambiguous? What are arms? What does it mean to bear them? At least with the first amendment we know exactly where we stand: Freedom of speech. It couldn’t be any clearer. But, the right to bear arms leaves the second amendment open to different interpretations. We need gun permits to carry a concealed weapon. Do we need knife permits? No. Yet both can, and often do, cause death. We can own a gun, or a rifle, or a sub-machine gun, or a machete, and dozens of other tools to kill, even our own bare hands. So, gun control is a debate in our country that makes no sense unless you broaden the ban or acceptance to include all instruments of death.,”

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